kawachi_title.gif

February2005

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28          

Top Page

Japanese

English

訳者あとがき
Translator's Afterword

木枠とStretcher


 この前キャンバスを作りました。学生の頃から、安くできるという理由で自作していましたが、ここでも作った時のこと。
 ライクスには素材別のワークショップ(技術室)があり、キャンバスの木枠はウッドワークショップ、キャンバス地はペイントワークショップでつくります。その他メタル、プリント,セラミックス,プラスティック、ケミカル、ビデオ、写真、デジタル等あり、各ワークショップには各素材の加工用機材と専任技術者がいて、技術面での相談や特殊な技術のサポートをしてくれます。
 
 木枠のことを指す言葉は英語でa stretcherですが、ここのストレッチャー作りのシステムがとっても優れていた!!ので紹介します。
 特にこのパーツ。外枠の四隅と支柱に、この小さな木のパーツをこの鉄のパーツ(画像1)で挟んで木ネジで固定します。この鉄のパーツのネジ穴は1〜2センチくらいネジが動けるよう余分にスペースが作ってある(画像2)のでこの木のパーツの出っ張った部分をたたいて外枠に食い込ませることができます。すると外枠が広がって、いつでも表面がピンと張るような状態に微調整できる。(画像3)いいでしょ?特許もんだとおもうんですけど。
 
 で、このストレッチャーですけど、その名通り、ストレッチするもの、つまり伸ばす、キャンバス地をピンと伸ばして張るというものです。   
 普通に「木枠」と呼んでいたときは、この構造物は木でできたキャンバス地の枠(フレーム)、限界線である、という意識でした。で、ストレッチャーと呼んだとき感じるのはキャンバス地を伸ばすための裏方、ツールである、というかんじ。木枠の役割がはっきりしている分、なんというか、張られる表面の役割、表面への視点もはっきりしてくる。
 ここで感じた考え方や名前、道具の違いは、すべて物質ありきでスタートしいた点です。その上で、ある物質の状態の維持の技術や、ある役割を持った名前がついている。だから今自分のしている仕事が具体的に理解できる。
 ウッドの技術者、Wimとペイントの技術者、Arendはいつもキャンバス作りの時に「システムだけあってもものは作れない、目を開いて、(本当にこういう言い方をする)目の前で起こっていることを1つ1つ確かめながら作業を進めなさい」と、再三、念を押してきます。この徹底した「物質を見る」という姿勢、私には大いに役立つものでした。なぜ役立ったかというと、技術者ではないアーティストとしての私の視点が理解しやすくなるからです。何だか肩の荷が下りた感がありました。私だけかしら。    
 蛇足ですが、Arendが、張った表面にできたしわのことを「バブル(泡)」って呼んでいました。しわと泡、この呼び名にも表面への視点のちょっとした違いを感じていますがまあ今日はこの辺で・・・。

February 7, 2005 6:56 AM

title%20logo.GIF

‘Kiwaku’ and ‘Stretcher’

I made a canvas the other day. Since I was a student, I usually make canvases by myself as it is cheaper; but it was my first try since I came here.
Rijks has workshops for various media. In order to make a canvas, first I go to the wood workshop to make the frame, and then to the paint workshop for the canvas. Other workshops are: metal, print, ceramics, plastic, chemical, video, photo, digital etc. They own special equipments, and there are technicians to help the artists.

A word for ‘kiwaku’ (wooden frame) in English is ‘stretcher.’ I would like to introduce the way they make stretchers here – as it is soooo smart!!
In particular, this part. They put this small wooden part between these metal parts (image 1), and fasten them onto the four corners of the frame and to the support. As this metal part has some flexibility (the screw can move about 1-2 cm), you can hammer the wooden part and crush it into the frame (image 2). This process always allows you to stretch the canvas tightly over the frame without failure (image 3). Isn’t it super? I think they should apply for the patent.

The stretcher, as it is called, is what ‘stretches’ the canvas. While I was using the word ‘frame,’ I saw it as a frame, as a border line. But when I call it a stretcher, there is a notion that this is a tool – something like a backstage worker – which has a role of stretching the canvas. As its role becomes clearer, the role of the other part – the one that is ‘stretched – also becomes visible. It makes me see the surface – the canvas – differently.
What I came to see was that every system, tool and name was made after a substance. The name was given in order to show its role, and the system is developed in order to preserve the substance. Paying attention to ‘what it is’ makes me see what I should do or why I do this.
Both Wim and Arend – the technicians of the wood workshop and the paint workshop – say ‘The system itself will not create anything. Open your eyes (they really say this) and check each time what is happening in front of your eyes.’ I think I learned something from what they told me. What I came to see was the way I look at things – the way I see things as an artist, not as technicians. I kind of felt relieved. Is it just me?
And one more thing... Arend calls wrinkles on the canvas ‘bubbles.’ Wrinkles and bubbles... this also makes me think of how people see things differently... but anyways, this is all for today.

February 7, 2005 6:56 AM

△TOP

ART TRACE